Sorry to bother you [2018]

“I just really need a job”


Wow it has been a really long time since I’ve been on my science fiction shit, watching and posting to my site. I’ve been recuperating from surgery but I’m much better now so let’s get back to it, eh!?

I watched this film months ago some time in my recovery so my memory is sketchy, but loosely, the film (directed by Boots RIley) follows Cassius Green (played by Lakeith Stanfield) and there are some other big names in the film as well like Danny Glover, Patton Oswalt, David Cross and more. From the offset, Cassius is struggling. He lives in his Uncle’s garage with his girlfriend. He gets a job as a telemarketer for a large corporation called RegalView – largely it seems to impress his girlfriend –  which progressively presents itself to be quite a morally corrupt company. The aim of the job is to call random people and sell shit and Cassius finds that he is not successful until he puts on his “white” voice at which point he starts to excel in the company. Meanwhile, his colleagues form a union to strike unfair working conditions at the company but Cassius sells out to get a higher paid position in the “elite” team. While working there he discovers that the company are selling military arms through cheap labour, that employees sign up for lifetime contracts and are living in conditions that could be likened to prison. Then, after being invited to the CEO’s house party, he makes an even more sordid discovery that he finds hard to ignore…

Didn’t want to give too much away, but I really enjoyed this film. 

On the face of it, it was a dark comedy but the deeper I went into the film, the more fantastical it became weaving themes around inequality throughout. From the start with Cassius’s living conditions which are ridiculous but totally normalised, to the working conditions that RegalView put their staff through, the clear tiered hierarchy between normal people and the “elite”… And there’s this moment at the house party where Cassius, who is a Black man, is made to rap to his fellow colleagues and on being asked to do that, he imploringly looks to the other Person Of Colour in the room, as if to say ‘is this for real’ who gives this blank look in response… it’s so sinister and illustrates this obvious hierarchy of power between white people and POC even among the “elite” tier in the company. It’s also a pretty typical racist microaggression in real life… Instead of getting to know Cassius, they’ve made assumptions about him based on his colour as if he belongs to a monoculture… It would be like approaching an Asian person and asking them to do some karate moves or to make sushi for you… 

I would be curious to know if someone who was racially all white (not mixed like myself or not a POC) picked up on the same tensions that I felt throughout; it felt like it was building for a long time to the point that the ending was a bit like a kick in the stomach. But then it also felt like despite hearing throughout the film through snippets of news and so on that something strange was happening at the company, the inequalities seemed so much like normal life that the ending really came out of leftfield. Damn I really wish I had written this post as soon as I had seen the film because my memory is a little hazy right now. I’ve read some other reviews of the film where people thought it was messy. If I was to be super critical I would say I didn’t really rate the girlfriend sub-plot in the film. Her character felt like just a device to illustrate how down-on-his-luck Cassius was and a yard stick to show us how morally deficient Cassius had become, but that was also pretty clear through the way he treated the union so I’m not sure that her plot really added anything. Though I love Tessa Thompson. She’s a total babe and an excellent actress. Let me know what you thought about it yourself in the comments. Would love to hear what people thought!

CN: sexual assault

One thing to note was that I found out afterwards that the actor who played the CEO, Armie Hammer, had allegedly sexually assaulted a number of women IRL which I of course believe. In retrospect, his inclusion in the film soured it for me (and has soured a number of other films Armie has been in which I loved like the beautiful ‘call me by your name’) but it’s not often you have films with such diversity, with such an unusual story. I’m just glad the film seems to have had a great critical response despite that. 

So, all in all, original story. Surprising, yet so familiar it could be set in the near future. Loved Lakeith’s performance as well as the performances of the peripheral characters. Really enjoyed it. Check it out on Netflix. 

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