Stowaway [2021]

“What are we gonna do, ask him to walk out of the airlock?”


Oh man, I meant to do a post about this one film a long time ago when I watched it back in June 2021.. Stowaway is a science fiction thriller which came out in 2021. You can see it on Netflix now, if you want to. I really meant to do a post about it straight away when I saw it because it had a big impact on me, but life took over, and I kept saying I would write something but never did. So, anyway, I’m doing that now; here I am writing a post about this! 

So, just to give a little synopsis about the film, here goes!

The film stars some pretty big names in Anna Kendrick, Daniel Dae Kim, Toni Collette and Shamier Anderson. It’s directed by Joe Penna and written by both Joe and Ryan Morrison. 

The story is about a crew of three people who are on a two-year mission to Mars, headed/piloted by Toni Collette’s character, a biologist in Daniel Dae Kim and Anna’s character as the medical researcher, Zoe. They take off from Earth and quickly find themselves in trouble when Michael, a stowaway, is found unconscious in a module somewhere in the ship sort of entangled in something that takes carbon dioxide from the air. As he falls from this module, he ends up destroying it which basically renders the ship unable to scrub carbon dioxide from it, so the longer that this extra person exists on the ship, the higher likelihood there is that they will suffocate. They move quickly to trying to think of various ways in order to scrub the CO2 from the air such as using lithium hydroxide canisters but the load is too much for them to handle. David then sacrifices part of his algae experiment which is literally the whole reason for the mission. Half of the algae die in the process and only provides enough CO2 scrubbing for a third person. Mission control suggests they try a dangerous mission to recover liquid oxygen from the spent upper stage rocket, which is not the ideal situation because it is so darn risky. So they spend time considering their options including whether to sacrifice Michael. Eventually they run out of time… all the algae has died which means they don’t have an option here. Presented with this, both Zoe and Daniel volunteer to try to retrieve the liquid oxygen. The mission is a total failure – predictably – and they barely make it back alive. Zoe ends up sacrificing herself, goes back to retrieve the canister, exposing herself to a lethal amount of radiation and the last scene is her looking at the stars and succumbing to death.

So, what did I think this film? 

I think it’s an interesting take on a conundrum, which I’m sure we’ve all seen, where there’s a wild trolley hurtling towards a split track and you are given a scenario of either killing one person who you don’t know or many who you do. What do you do? If Star Trek and Spock have taught me anything, it is that the needs of the many far outweigh the needs of the few and this is the core argument throughout much of the film.

I find it very fitting that Anna Kendrick’s character being a medical professional and therefore altruistic role ends up both pleading for a caring outcome (rather than killing Michael) and ends up herself volunteering to what is ultimately her own demise. I guess all the characters in this live up to the roles that they play and in the ways in which they ultimately approach this challenge. Toni’s character leads them to this difficult solution… Daniel’s character being the scientist tries to come to a scientific solution.. Anna’s character, as mentioned, takes on the caregiver role. And Shamier’s character Michael is the innocent in this situation; being the least experienced of the team. I found it interesting as well that one of the reasons for Anna’s character to sacrifice herself is that she did not have a family and I think that plays into an archaic gender role. Toni and Daniel’s characters can’t sacrifice themselves because they are core to the mission. One of the suggestions is that as Anna’s character does not have a family, that this makes her the preferred candidate. Does that devalue her as a person? It seems like that is implied. I guess it would be almost too easy for Michael, the person who stowed away, to sacrifice himself. It would be quite a boring ending. 

I also found it interesting that basically all of the algae had died because of this situation, so their whole reason for going to Mars at all (for, I assume, terraforming Mars) is destroyed.. It makes me wonder what happened afterwards when they got to Mars. I mean, it’s sort of implied that they would have gotten to Mars in the end because the end of the film is Anna Kendrick looking out at the stars and you can faintly see Mars in the distance. It feels hopeful despite this great tragedy. But then when they get there, what are they even gonna do? Are they just gonna turn around and go back? I always find this question of terraforming other planets quite ridiculous anyway… It’s an age old theme but I find it so silly because we have a perfectly habitable planet that we live on right now but we just treat it like shit. If we just looked after the planet that we lived on, perhaps we wouldn’t need to have conversations about terraforming anything because the planet that we live on literally has everything that we need in abundance. 

I really like that they never truly address why Michael has stowed in the ship because it almost seems irrelevant. It’s a mystery but knowing ‘why’ would not actually help them in their situation. I mean, I assume Michael was desperate to be part of this mission and that’s why this happened but equally he could have been fixing something and got stuck there in the module. Often in films where there is a stowaway, usually they’re young, maybe they’re trying to run away from something, or it’s something or someone evil putting the crew in danger intentionally. And so I think this was a really nice twist because this character Michael was actually very innocent. You can tell he is very troubled by his presence causing such a consequence, and that he did not wish to hurt anyone.

So all in all, simple concept and interesting moral conundrum. Well acted. At times stunning CGI. But quite a predictable film I would say. Still worth the watch.

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THX 1138 [1971]

“Let us be thankful we have an occupation to fill. Work hard; increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy.”


So, THX 1138 is the directional feature film debut of one GEORGE LUCAS and was The Watchers film in January! It’s pretty strange to see it – for me, the first time – because it’s so basic in comparison to the world we later know him to have created in Star Wars but you can see seeds of Star Wars in THX 1138. There’s a totalitarianism vibe that is hard to dissociate from the Order. But anyway, I’ll talk about the plot of the film first and then I’ll go on to how I kind of felt about it.

So in this dystopian future, sexual intercourse and reproduction are prohibited. People are forced to have these mind-altering drugs in order to function every day and when we watch the film, we’re seeing it from the perspective of the top down. So we’re watching over the people who run this dystopian future system. We don’t really see ‘the masses’ except mostly through CCTV. THX 1138 is actually the name of the protagonist in the film. His flatmate is a woman and she’s sort of meant to be his ‘mate’, paired with him by the state (I doubt he had a say in this) but there’s a distance between them. Everything about their home and their way of living is very sanctioned and perfectly white from the clothes that they wear to the house they live in. Emotions and sex and family are all very taboo and everyone lives in uniformity.The system uses mindless police androids to control the masses. THX 1138 and his co-workers function to create these androids to police over people, and if anyone gets out of line, they are penalised in some sort of way or they might be killed. THX 1138 seems to be a very diligent worker and devout to the order of things but lately has been going through feelings of anxiety so goes to confession where a monk-like figure tells him the doctrine which is to be a good worker and be productive and it will ALL BE OK which is very capitalist, isn’t it? He’s told he’s a true believer, and the monk blesses him telling him ”work hard, increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy”. But spoiler. No one’s happy. There’s this mindlessness that seems to have taken hold, probably due to the drugs everyone is being given. Like even masturbating is a very sanctioned boring form of masturbation and we see the protagonist masturbating with a robotic arm so he’s not even allowed to touch himself in this future There’s a moment in there where he is watching porn and there’s a naked Black woman which gave off Blaxploitation vibes to me. I don’t know why it was necessary for the figure of his desire to be a Black woman, but this is a common trope in film that paints Black women as hyper sexualised, which I found very uncomfortable. Anyways… So it turns out that THX’s roommate has been slowly cutting out and hiding his daily pills and soon we realise that his anxiety is a symptom of him coming off of the drugs, because he’s becoming suddenly more self-aware and it’s like he is coming out of a fog and starts to feel again and remember normal human emotions like the aforementioned anxiety and also sexual desire. She confesses what she had done to him to free him, and they end up having sex. He tries to go to work after that and he’s not able to function in the way he needs to for the hazardous monotonous job he does in the factory. He ends up making a mistake and, what looks like, a nuclear rod burns its way through the building and the powers that be realise he has been illegally not taking his drugs. He gets sent to prison where we see the woman very briefly and then she is never seen again. The prison seems to have no exit but someone called SEN and a hologram unit called SRT (who was actually my favourite character in this film) team up and manage to escape. They become separated and both SEN and SRT are apprehended or die in the process, but THX makes it to the surface and the last scene is him making it out of the chamber and looking at the setting sun.

So firstly, I think the ending is a really beautiful moment because you don’t know why they’ve been living this way. There’s very little dialogue to actually tell you why they live in this weird underground dystopian future. Usually with films like this there’s a specific reason and it’s spelled out very clearly. I mean, maybe I missed it, but it’s usually something like people have to live underground because there’s nuclear waste, or the humans have destroyed the earth or the powers that be wanted to create a cleaner, less disease ridden society which necessitates living this sort of way. Or, I don’t know, humans have become so diabolical that people were stepped in and created these systems that will take away these horrible natural urges that humans have to be terrible which the monkdom in this and the sanctioning normal sexual urges in this sort of suggests might be the case but we don’t really know… So when he climbs out, it feels like he is really going into the unknown. Like he probably doesn’t know if the atmosphere is now about to sustain life but it’s either escape to freedom (which may involve dying but at least it would be his choice) or surrender only to die. I really like that ending. It ended up being so hopeful. I always have a lot of questions though with endings like this, like how is he gonna survive out there? My brain is the type that I play out reality after the last scene and that protagonist lives on. I’d like to think he survived and found others just like him.

Oh, one thing to note is that there is a shorter version of this film, because George made the original short as a uni student and it’s well loved also. So if you like this longer version, then go see the shorter one or vice versa because yeah, they’re both enjoyable and endearing in their own ways. Some people really love the short version more than the longer version. I had no opinion whether one was better than the other. I liked them both for different reasons.

I enjoyed the bit in the film where you see the cost of the android police pursuing THX and it keeps going up and up and up until the expense of the capture exceeds their allocated budget and they’re told to just leave THX alone. Ah capitalism.

Supposedly the feature was a commercial flop which made back $945,000 in rentals for Warner Bros, but left the studio in the red… For a first feature film to flop like that, it could have been the end of George’s career and he might never have made Star Wars so I’m glad that he was able to continue in the industry despite that. Looking at some of the commentary, Robert Ebert of the Chicago Sun Times said that “this film suffers somewhat from its simple storyline but as a work of visual imagination is special and as haunting as parts of 2001 Space Odyssey, Silent Running and the Andromeda String”. And then Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune said “the principal problem with this film is that it lacks imagination… the essential component of a science fiction film. Some persons might claim the world of THX 1138 is here right now. A more reasonable opinion would hold that we are facing the problems of that world right now. Time has passed the film by”. I would disagree with the latter. I think that it’s a mistake to think that science fiction aims to create fantastical new problems that we might have in future. It’s always a mirror of the time we live in right now. Look at films like Soylent Green from the same era, which looked at inequality, food scarcity, sexism… all problems they were facing in the 70s but the film mirrored that in a guise of the future. THX 1138 is no different. Certainly the themes it is based on may not be novel… Police brutality. Man versus machine. Capitalism. Furthering unscrupulous aims. Inequality. They’re problems that existed when the film was made in the 70s just like they exist now. Just because you’re saying something similar to other voices it doesn’t strip it of its worth.

I thought that I might hate this film actually, because I tend to dislike a lot of 70s films particularly because they tend to portray women in a certain light, as commodities or pieces of flesh only. So, I was surprised that the protagonist woman in this film somehow managed to undo her training on her own and then also plan to undo that for THX 1138 in order to save him. It makes her a mastermind! Usually, films in the 70s treat women like a damsel. It seems like a lot of films in that decade put women ‘in their places’ and I don’t really understand why totally. Maybe because those films made more money? Because films with strong women was an out there concept for the 70s? I don’t really know. It always surprises me but of course I’m seeing the film with a modern lens and it doesn’t work… Anyway, I was really surprised that this woman ended up being a bit of a saviour. That made the film quite special to me. That said, she did end up just being a vehicle for the dude to escape and then we never see her again.. and there’s also that cringey Blaxploitation bit… All I can say is the film is very much ‘of its time’..

So overall, it’s a simple concept but enjoyable. I can see why it has a cult following now. It has good bones and felt like a little star wars seed with the whole totalitarianism thing. Nice to see how far George has come.

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The Endless [2017]

“You act like it’s crazy, like I’m the first person in history that actually wants to live forever. With people that like him. You know, there is not much difference between being stuck in a loop and being stuck repeating the same shitty day over and over like back home until I die.”


Oh man. I’ve been meaning to write posts for so long. 2021 was a bad year for mental health (for lots of people but specifically me) and I have only had sporadic desire to write but I have the spoons for it today so I wanted to quickly post a couple of recent SOPHFIFEST The Watcher films from Jan and Feb (this week) while I have the drive to!

So, here goes! ‘The Endless’ is a 2017, science fiction/horror movie which stars and is directed by Justin Benson and Aaron Morehead. This isn’t the first film that they’ve co-written, co-directed and starred in. It’s actually meant to be a kind of sequel to their 2012 film ‘Resolution’, which I’ve not yet seen but I am going to watch thoooon. (Resolution shares the same universe and some of the same characters supposedly.)

So THIS film begins with brothers, Justin and Aaron Smith when they receive a video cassette from Camp Arcadia, a group they went to when they were kids after their mum died. They both have very different ideas about what happened when they were there. Aaron thinks that it was simple, commune kind of living, and Justin (who seems to be the older broski) thinks that it was a cult so they have very different feelings about that period of their life. There’s talk in the tape about ascension and Justin is worried that it relates to some sort of mass suicide but manages to still be talked into returning when Aaron expresses that he hates his boring day-to-day life. I think that Aaron particularly feels resentful that he lives this life when he could be back at Camp. So they go to Camp Arcadia. Everyone is quite friendly with them and it feels like no one has really aged. Aaron receives a lot of attention which he welcomes but Justin is super skeptical. There seems to be one member – Hal – who appears leader-like but at some point he says that there are no leaders in this camp. He’s also a physics buff and has a complicated equation drawn in chalk on a wall, to what he cannot say. Aaron grows very fond of the camp and he ends up convincing Justin to stay an additional day. And then lots of weird things start happening at the camp, which no one seems to be that phased by. There’s a moment when they play this weird tug of war game with a rope that just sort of floats in the sky and they just believe that someone is on on a ladder, holding the rope out of sight. We see birds flying in circles. There’s the weird dude who keeps running past them without saying a word. The sobbing woman. Justin thinks someone is watching him. He gets left a picture of a buoy, which he later finds in the lake so he dives down to see what it leads to and nearly drowns in the process (it’s a box with another tape). Oh and there’s the other matter of there being MULTIPLE FRICKING MOONS! And the general ominous words from Hal suggesting Justin come to a conclusion before the third moon. Justin is, rightly so, freaked out by all of this and wants to leave but then he and his brother have a fight and it turns out Justin told him a bunch of lies when they were kids, suggesting that the people at camp were all castrated and alien loving death cultists. This makes Aaron and Hal super mad. Hal asks Justin to leave, but he can’t because his car is borked. Typical. Justin tries to get help and bumps into the guy who keeps running past him, and the guy tells him that they’re all trapped there in time loops, that he tried to kill himself many times and that an entity is trapping them there (it seems to get some sort of sick pleasure out of the violent nature of their repeated deaths, evident when he’s like “it won’t let me sleep, it won’t let me dream”). He warns him if he doesn’t get out by the time the 3rd moon rises, Justin and his brother will also be trapped and gives him a compass to help him find his way. He ends up finding Aaron but not before seeing more weirdness and they go back to camp and find a previously locked door open (the spoooooooky door) inside which is a tonne of different tapes dated from years and years ago and when they enter, a TV starts playing and it’s showing them Justin and Aaron in different scenarios from the entity’s perspective. Freaked out, they try to find the camp peeps and realise that the whole camp have been obliterated and then the entity starts to engulf the camp and they have to run. In the mad dash, they fight over Justin wanting to do things his way and eventually he relents and they manage to get away. The last scene suggests they might be looping to the beginning but then you realise they might have actually made it out.

Sooooo, I really enjoyed this film. The concept is so interesting and something I’ve not seen before. They put a few different sci fi/horror concepts together for maximum creep factor. The weird cultish camp. The Stepford Wives type grinning fella. The magnetic cult leader. It gave off this real Deliverance vibe which set the hairs on my neck on end pretty early on, despite a lot of the film being shot in a lot of light. It would be easy to make something creepy in a cultish cabin in the woods at nighttime; that would just play on our natural fear of nighttime danger… but this film managed to maintain and build tension without any of that for the most part. Not helped by the brothers’ tendency to make a lot of silly (what seem like) dangerous choices throughout the film, and you’re just like why are you doing that, that’s really not smart dude?! I believe, also, the way the two brothers were written lends creedance to that because they play two different dynamics. They play the child and the adult. The innocent and the skeptical. So throughout you hear perspectives of the camp and its people through these two different lenses and not really knowing where you stand and whose opinion to trust makes it so uneasy. So when you do start seeing a bunch of weird things happening you think maybe you can’t trust your judgement, because both Aaron and Justin are unreliable narrators of this story.

I also really enjoyed that it felt very much that the sci fi and horror elements seemed to come secondary to this story of brotherhood. At the beginning Aaron is complaining about being stuck in Justin’s way of doing things which has them in their own little loop. It takes them getting stuck at the camp to firstly realise that they WERE stuck but also maybe doing things Justin’s way… the cynical, one foot in front of the other, not trusting anyone or anything, only having each other… it really hasn’t served them all that well. By letting go at the the end of the film, Aaron feels like he has closure from this camp and maybe Justin does have capacity to change. It’s a very loving ending. It’s like Justin accepts Aaron in that moment, and then they pass what is apprently the grave of the mother at the end, so it feels like a little nod to her that they’re okay; they found their way eventually.

Another part of me feels like maybe they didn’t get out at the end. In fact, maybe they’ve been actually stuck in a loop this whole time. We assume that they left the camp when they were kids and that they couldn’t possibly be stuck by the same entity because the people in the camp are ageless even though maybe 20 years have passed… But maybe no one ages in those specific time loops because most of the people who re-spawn do so after they try to kill themselves. We see the camp eviscerated and assume the entity did that but maybe they WERE a suicide cult and that’s what keeps bringing them back to the start. Maybe because Aaron and Justin endured their own loop, and were unaware they were stuck in one, they never tried to kill themselves so they aged. I don’t know. That has been playing on my mind since I watched it and I love that. There’s also the moment at the end when they drive away and you think they’re not gonna make it because there’s loads of birds trying to get through the forcefield and bouncing off and it seems like they make it out but my brain goes to: OR IS IT?! My brain has been saying WHAT IF since I watched this film. I mean, it must be called The Endless for a reason. Maybe it really is Endless.

I have a lot of questions in my mind about when this all began. Who was the first person to get stuck? The tapes behind the locked spooky door suggest this goes deeper than the handful of characters we see. And I also wonder what the entity gets out of this. Where does it come from? How long has it existed? What does it really look like? What is the purpose of all of these different time loops? Does it feed off of them somehow? Or is it just for its own entertainment? Is it like a weird, adult version of Monsters Inc where this entity scares these people to death over and over in their little time pods, and that generates enough energy for this alien’s home world? Maybe Aaron and Justin ARE on its homeworld, trapped. Or maybe they’re actually in limbo. One theory that crossed my mind was that they actually had something to do with their mother’s death… that they inadvertantly caused her to crash with their bickering when they were kids and while she went to heaven, they went to this hell dimension where they were forced to live out their own personal sense of hell until they could come to terms with something they had to learn… which might work because the cult, and the weird angry dude may have killed themselves… And there’s a couple moments when Hal is trying to work out some answer. One way is through an equation (which supposedly is about light?? I don’t really know) and another is in a moment where he says something like ‘maybe the lesson here is forgiveness’ about Justin, after which he immediately acts in ways that are very unfogiving. Maybe they’re all stuck in hell too with something to learn before they can ‘ascend’ to heaven, and the entity is actually a monstrous Lucifer. And I’ve also seen some theories that this is all a machination of the character Mike, that he is just insane and this is all in his mind (but that would be WAY too easy).

There’s a potential further theory tied into the idea of the land being Arcadia, which is a Greek mythological bountiful, utopic garden, inhabited by shepherds and unspoiled by savagery (said savagery possibly depicted by Aaron and Justin), but I haven’t explored that concept enough to have an opinion on this. I will consider this some more!


I also enjoyed the grainy nature of the film. I don’t remember what it was like right at the beginning when they were in ‘real life’, if it was particularly colourful but the sepia type change was so subtle that it took me a long time to realise anything had changed. And at first I just thought wow dusty terrain. And then I realised that was an intentional choice to make the camp and everything stuck in these loops look like something of the past. Like an old photo. There’s even a moment where we see a man in a tent who is re-spawning over and over again and he warns Aaron(?) to get away as far as he can, and it seems like the graphics inside the tent look black and white almost which seems to depict the man’s comparative age, as in he’s been there a longggggg long time. Supposedly, he’s credited as something like 1900s man, so that makes a lot of sense. It really reminded me of BioShock Infinite actually… there are these moments in that game when you can see supplied in other dimensions as black and white blobs and the tent inside has the same sort of vibe to it. Perhaps the look of the film could have been more polished, but the film didn’t have a very big budget and I think what they managed to achieve with the budget they had is WAYYYYYY BETTTERRRR than a lot of big hollywood films.

So all in all, really enjoyable film, great idea. Love that they tied it to their previous film. It makes the world feel large and full of a lot of possibility for sequels that left me wanting to understand more. I have so many questions but I think that’s what makes this film so compelling. A+ would watch again.

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