Stowaway [2021]

“What are we gonna do, ask him to walk out of the airlock?”


Oh man, I meant to do a post about this one film a long time ago when I watched it back in June 2021.. Stowaway is a science fiction thriller which came out in 2021. You can see it on Netflix now, if you want to. I really meant to do a post about it straight away when I saw it because it had a big impact on me, but life took over, and I kept saying I would write something but never did. So, anyway, I’m doing that now; here I am writing a post about this! 

So, just to give a little synopsis about the film, here goes!

The film stars some pretty big names in Anna Kendrick, Daniel Dae Kim, Toni Collette and Shamier Anderson. It’s directed by Joe Penna and written by both Joe and Ryan Morrison. 

The story is about a crew of three people who are on a two-year mission to Mars, headed/piloted by Toni Collette’s character, a biologist in Daniel Dae Kim and Anna’s character as the medical researcher, Zoe. They take off from Earth and quickly find themselves in trouble when Michael, a stowaway, is found unconscious in a module somewhere in the ship sort of entangled in something that takes carbon dioxide from the air. As he falls from this module, he ends up destroying it which basically renders the ship unable to scrub carbon dioxide from it, so the longer that this extra person exists on the ship, the higher likelihood there is that they will suffocate. They move quickly to trying to think of various ways in order to scrub the CO2 from the air such as using lithium hydroxide canisters but the load is too much for them to handle. David then sacrifices part of his algae experiment which is literally the whole reason for the mission. Half of the algae die in the process and only provides enough CO2 scrubbing for a third person. Mission control suggests they try a dangerous mission to recover liquid oxygen from the spent upper stage rocket, which is not the ideal situation because it is so darn risky. So they spend time considering their options including whether to sacrifice Michael. Eventually they run out of time… all the algae has died which means they don’t have an option here. Presented with this, both Zoe and Daniel volunteer to try to retrieve the liquid oxygen. The mission is a total failure – predictably – and they barely make it back alive. Zoe ends up sacrificing herself, goes back to retrieve the canister, exposing herself to a lethal amount of radiation and the last scene is her looking at the stars and succumbing to death.

So, what did I think this film? 

I think it’s an interesting take on a conundrum, which I’m sure we’ve all seen, where there’s a wild trolley hurtling towards a split track and you are given a scenario of either killing one person who you don’t know or many who you do. What do you do? If Star Trek and Spock have taught me anything, it is that the needs of the many far outweigh the needs of the few and this is the core argument throughout much of the film.

I find it very fitting that Anna Kendrick’s character being a medical professional and therefore altruistic role ends up both pleading for a caring outcome (rather than killing Michael) and ends up herself volunteering to what is ultimately her own demise. I guess all the characters in this live up to the roles that they play and in the ways in which they ultimately approach this challenge. Toni’s character leads them to this difficult solution… Daniel’s character being the scientist tries to come to a scientific solution.. Anna’s character, as mentioned, takes on the caregiver role. And Shamier’s character Michael is the innocent in this situation; being the least experienced of the team. I found it interesting as well that one of the reasons for Anna’s character to sacrifice herself is that she did not have a family and I think that plays into an archaic gender role. Toni and Daniel’s characters can’t sacrifice themselves because they are core to the mission. One of the suggestions is that as Anna’s character does not have a family, that this makes her the preferred candidate. Does that devalue her as a person? It seems like that is implied. I guess it would be almost too easy for Michael, the person who stowed away, to sacrifice himself. It would be quite a boring ending. 

I also found it interesting that basically all of the algae had died because of this situation, so their whole reason for going to Mars at all (for, I assume, terraforming Mars) is destroyed.. It makes me wonder what happened afterwards when they got to Mars. I mean, it’s sort of implied that they would have gotten to Mars in the end because the end of the film is Anna Kendrick looking out at the stars and you can faintly see Mars in the distance. It feels hopeful despite this great tragedy. But then when they get there, what are they even gonna do? Are they just gonna turn around and go back? I always find this question of terraforming other planets quite ridiculous anyway… It’s an age old theme but I find it so silly because we have a perfectly habitable planet that we live on right now but we just treat it like shit. If we just looked after the planet that we lived on, perhaps we wouldn’t need to have conversations about terraforming anything because the planet that we live on literally has everything that we need in abundance. 

I really like that they never truly address why Michael has stowed in the ship because it almost seems irrelevant. It’s a mystery but knowing ‘why’ would not actually help them in their situation. I mean, I assume Michael was desperate to be part of this mission and that’s why this happened but equally he could have been fixing something and got stuck there in the module. Often in films where there is a stowaway, usually they’re young, maybe they’re trying to run away from something, or it’s something or someone evil putting the crew in danger intentionally. And so I think this was a really nice twist because this character Michael was actually very innocent. You can tell he is very troubled by his presence causing such a consequence, and that he did not wish to hurt anyone.

So all in all, simple concept and interesting moral conundrum. Well acted. At times stunning CGI. But quite a predictable film I would say. Still worth the watch.

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THX 1138 [1971]

“Let us be thankful we have an occupation to fill. Work hard; increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy.”


So, THX 1138 is the directional feature film debut of one GEORGE LUCAS and was The Watchers film in January! It’s pretty strange to see it – for me, the first time – because it’s so basic in comparison to the world we later know him to have created in Star Wars but you can see seeds of Star Wars in THX 1138. There’s a totalitarianism vibe that is hard to dissociate from the Order. But anyway, I’ll talk about the plot of the film first and then I’ll go on to how I kind of felt about it.

So in this dystopian future, sexual intercourse and reproduction are prohibited. People are forced to have these mind-altering drugs in order to function every day and when we watch the film, we’re seeing it from the perspective of the top down. So we’re watching over the people who run this dystopian future system. We don’t really see ‘the masses’ except mostly through CCTV. THX 1138 is actually the name of the protagonist in the film. His flatmate is a woman and she’s sort of meant to be his ‘mate’, paired with him by the state (I doubt he had a say in this) but there’s a distance between them. Everything about their home and their way of living is very sanctioned and perfectly white from the clothes that they wear to the house they live in. Emotions and sex and family are all very taboo and everyone lives in uniformity.The system uses mindless police androids to control the masses. THX 1138 and his co-workers function to create these androids to police over people, and if anyone gets out of line, they are penalised in some sort of way or they might be killed. THX 1138 seems to be a very diligent worker and devout to the order of things but lately has been going through feelings of anxiety so goes to confession where a monk-like figure tells him the doctrine which is to be a good worker and be productive and it will ALL BE OK which is very capitalist, isn’t it? He’s told he’s a true believer, and the monk blesses him telling him ”work hard, increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy”. But spoiler. No one’s happy. There’s this mindlessness that seems to have taken hold, probably due to the drugs everyone is being given. Like even masturbating is a very sanctioned boring form of masturbation and we see the protagonist masturbating with a robotic arm so he’s not even allowed to touch himself in this future There’s a moment in there where he is watching porn and there’s a naked Black woman which gave off Blaxploitation vibes to me. I don’t know why it was necessary for the figure of his desire to be a Black woman, but this is a common trope in film that paints Black women as hyper sexualised, which I found very uncomfortable. Anyways… So it turns out that THX’s roommate has been slowly cutting out and hiding his daily pills and soon we realise that his anxiety is a symptom of him coming off of the drugs, because he’s becoming suddenly more self-aware and it’s like he is coming out of a fog and starts to feel again and remember normal human emotions like the aforementioned anxiety and also sexual desire. She confesses what she had done to him to free him, and they end up having sex. He tries to go to work after that and he’s not able to function in the way he needs to for the hazardous monotonous job he does in the factory. He ends up making a mistake and, what looks like, a nuclear rod burns its way through the building and the powers that be realise he has been illegally not taking his drugs. He gets sent to prison where we see the woman very briefly and then she is never seen again. The prison seems to have no exit but someone called SEN and a hologram unit called SRT (who was actually my favourite character in this film) team up and manage to escape. They become separated and both SEN and SRT are apprehended or die in the process, but THX makes it to the surface and the last scene is him making it out of the chamber and looking at the setting sun.

So firstly, I think the ending is a really beautiful moment because you don’t know why they’ve been living this way. There’s very little dialogue to actually tell you why they live in this weird underground dystopian future. Usually with films like this there’s a specific reason and it’s spelled out very clearly. I mean, maybe I missed it, but it’s usually something like people have to live underground because there’s nuclear waste, or the humans have destroyed the earth or the powers that be wanted to create a cleaner, less disease ridden society which necessitates living this sort of way. Or, I don’t know, humans have become so diabolical that people were stepped in and created these systems that will take away these horrible natural urges that humans have to be terrible which the monkdom in this and the sanctioning normal sexual urges in this sort of suggests might be the case but we don’t really know… So when he climbs out, it feels like he is really going into the unknown. Like he probably doesn’t know if the atmosphere is now about to sustain life but it’s either escape to freedom (which may involve dying but at least it would be his choice) or surrender only to die. I really like that ending. It ended up being so hopeful. I always have a lot of questions though with endings like this, like how is he gonna survive out there? My brain is the type that I play out reality after the last scene and that protagonist lives on. I’d like to think he survived and found others just like him.

Oh, one thing to note is that there is a shorter version of this film, because George made the original short as a uni student and it’s well loved also. So if you like this longer version, then go see the shorter one or vice versa because yeah, they’re both enjoyable and endearing in their own ways. Some people really love the short version more than the longer version. I had no opinion whether one was better than the other. I liked them both for different reasons.

I enjoyed the bit in the film where you see the cost of the android police pursuing THX and it keeps going up and up and up until the expense of the capture exceeds their allocated budget and they’re told to just leave THX alone. Ah capitalism.

Supposedly the feature was a commercial flop which made back $945,000 in rentals for Warner Bros, but left the studio in the red… For a first feature film to flop like that, it could have been the end of George’s career and he might never have made Star Wars so I’m glad that he was able to continue in the industry despite that. Looking at some of the commentary, Robert Ebert of the Chicago Sun Times said that “this film suffers somewhat from its simple storyline but as a work of visual imagination is special and as haunting as parts of 2001 Space Odyssey, Silent Running and the Andromeda String”. And then Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune said “the principal problem with this film is that it lacks imagination… the essential component of a science fiction film. Some persons might claim the world of THX 1138 is here right now. A more reasonable opinion would hold that we are facing the problems of that world right now. Time has passed the film by”. I would disagree with the latter. I think that it’s a mistake to think that science fiction aims to create fantastical new problems that we might have in future. It’s always a mirror of the time we live in right now. Look at films like Soylent Green from the same era, which looked at inequality, food scarcity, sexism… all problems they were facing in the 70s but the film mirrored that in a guise of the future. THX 1138 is no different. Certainly the themes it is based on may not be novel… Police brutality. Man versus machine. Capitalism. Furthering unscrupulous aims. Inequality. They’re problems that existed when the film was made in the 70s just like they exist now. Just because you’re saying something similar to other voices it doesn’t strip it of its worth.

I thought that I might hate this film actually, because I tend to dislike a lot of 70s films particularly because they tend to portray women in a certain light, as commodities or pieces of flesh only. So, I was surprised that the protagonist woman in this film somehow managed to undo her training on her own and then also plan to undo that for THX 1138 in order to save him. It makes her a mastermind! Usually, films in the 70s treat women like a damsel. It seems like a lot of films in that decade put women ‘in their places’ and I don’t really understand why totally. Maybe because those films made more money? Because films with strong women was an out there concept for the 70s? I don’t really know. It always surprises me but of course I’m seeing the film with a modern lens and it doesn’t work… Anyway, I was really surprised that this woman ended up being a bit of a saviour. That made the film quite special to me. That said, she did end up just being a vehicle for the dude to escape and then we never see her again.. and there’s also that cringey Blaxploitation bit… All I can say is the film is very much ‘of its time’..

So overall, it’s a simple concept but enjoyable. I can see why it has a cult following now. It has good bones and felt like a little star wars seed with the whole totalitarianism thing. Nice to see how far George has come.

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The Endless [2017]

“You act like it’s crazy, like I’m the first person in history that actually wants to live forever. With people that like him. You know, there is not much difference between being stuck in a loop and being stuck repeating the same shitty day over and over like back home until I die.”


Oh man. I’ve been meaning to write posts for so long. 2021 was a bad year for mental health (for lots of people but specifically me) and I have only had sporadic desire to write but I have the spoons for it today so I wanted to quickly post a couple of recent SOPHFIFEST The Watcher films from Jan and Feb (this week) while I have the drive to!

So, here goes! ‘The Endless’ is a 2017, science fiction/horror movie which stars and is directed by Justin Benson and Aaron Morehead. This isn’t the first film that they’ve co-written, co-directed and starred in. It’s actually meant to be a kind of sequel to their 2012 film ‘Resolution’, which I’ve not yet seen but I am going to watch thoooon. (Resolution shares the same universe and some of the same characters supposedly.)

So THIS film begins with brothers, Justin and Aaron Smith when they receive a video cassette from Camp Arcadia, a group they went to when they were kids after their mum died. They both have very different ideas about what happened when they were there. Aaron thinks that it was simple, commune kind of living, and Justin (who seems to be the older broski) thinks that it was a cult so they have very different feelings about that period of their life. There’s talk in the tape about ascension and Justin is worried that it relates to some sort of mass suicide but manages to still be talked into returning when Aaron expresses that he hates his boring day-to-day life. I think that Aaron particularly feels resentful that he lives this life when he could be back at Camp. So they go to Camp Arcadia. Everyone is quite friendly with them and it feels like no one has really aged. Aaron receives a lot of attention which he welcomes but Justin is super skeptical. There seems to be one member – Hal – who appears leader-like but at some point he says that there are no leaders in this camp. He’s also a physics buff and has a complicated equation drawn in chalk on a wall, to what he cannot say. Aaron grows very fond of the camp and he ends up convincing Justin to stay an additional day. And then lots of weird things start happening at the camp, which no one seems to be that phased by. There’s a moment when they play this weird tug of war game with a rope that just sort of floats in the sky and they just believe that someone is on on a ladder, holding the rope out of sight. We see birds flying in circles. There’s the weird dude who keeps running past them without saying a word. The sobbing woman. Justin thinks someone is watching him. He gets left a picture of a buoy, which he later finds in the lake so he dives down to see what it leads to and nearly drowns in the process (it’s a box with another tape). Oh and there’s the other matter of there being MULTIPLE FRICKING MOONS! And the general ominous words from Hal suggesting Justin come to a conclusion before the third moon. Justin is, rightly so, freaked out by all of this and wants to leave but then he and his brother have a fight and it turns out Justin told him a bunch of lies when they were kids, suggesting that the people at camp were all castrated and alien loving death cultists. This makes Aaron and Hal super mad. Hal asks Justin to leave, but he can’t because his car is borked. Typical. Justin tries to get help and bumps into the guy who keeps running past him, and the guy tells him that they’re all trapped there in time loops, that he tried to kill himself many times and that an entity is trapping them there (it seems to get some sort of sick pleasure out of the violent nature of their repeated deaths, evident when he’s like “it won’t let me sleep, it won’t let me dream”). He warns him if he doesn’t get out by the time the 3rd moon rises, Justin and his brother will also be trapped and gives him a compass to help him find his way. He ends up finding Aaron but not before seeing more weirdness and they go back to camp and find a previously locked door open (the spoooooooky door) inside which is a tonne of different tapes dated from years and years ago and when they enter, a TV starts playing and it’s showing them Justin and Aaron in different scenarios from the entity’s perspective. Freaked out, they try to find the camp peeps and realise that the whole camp have been obliterated and then the entity starts to engulf the camp and they have to run. In the mad dash, they fight over Justin wanting to do things his way and eventually he relents and they manage to get away. The last scene suggests they might be looping to the beginning but then you realise they might have actually made it out.

Sooooo, I really enjoyed this film. The concept is so interesting and something I’ve not seen before. They put a few different sci fi/horror concepts together for maximum creep factor. The weird cultish camp. The Stepford Wives type grinning fella. The magnetic cult leader. It gave off this real Deliverance vibe which set the hairs on my neck on end pretty early on, despite a lot of the film being shot in a lot of light. It would be easy to make something creepy in a cultish cabin in the woods at nighttime; that would just play on our natural fear of nighttime danger… but this film managed to maintain and build tension without any of that for the most part. Not helped by the brothers’ tendency to make a lot of silly (what seem like) dangerous choices throughout the film, and you’re just like why are you doing that, that’s really not smart dude?! I believe, also, the way the two brothers were written lends creedance to that because they play two different dynamics. They play the child and the adult. The innocent and the skeptical. So throughout you hear perspectives of the camp and its people through these two different lenses and not really knowing where you stand and whose opinion to trust makes it so uneasy. So when you do start seeing a bunch of weird things happening you think maybe you can’t trust your judgement, because both Aaron and Justin are unreliable narrators of this story.

I also really enjoyed that it felt very much that the sci fi and horror elements seemed to come secondary to this story of brotherhood. At the beginning Aaron is complaining about being stuck in Justin’s way of doing things which has them in their own little loop. It takes them getting stuck at the camp to firstly realise that they WERE stuck but also maybe doing things Justin’s way… the cynical, one foot in front of the other, not trusting anyone or anything, only having each other… it really hasn’t served them all that well. By letting go at the the end of the film, Aaron feels like he has closure from this camp and maybe Justin does have capacity to change. It’s a very loving ending. It’s like Justin accepts Aaron in that moment, and then they pass what is apprently the grave of the mother at the end, so it feels like a little nod to her that they’re okay; they found their way eventually.

Another part of me feels like maybe they didn’t get out at the end. In fact, maybe they’ve been actually stuck in a loop this whole time. We assume that they left the camp when they were kids and that they couldn’t possibly be stuck by the same entity because the people in the camp are ageless even though maybe 20 years have passed… But maybe no one ages in those specific time loops because most of the people who re-spawn do so after they try to kill themselves. We see the camp eviscerated and assume the entity did that but maybe they WERE a suicide cult and that’s what keeps bringing them back to the start. Maybe because Aaron and Justin endured their own loop, and were unaware they were stuck in one, they never tried to kill themselves so they aged. I don’t know. That has been playing on my mind since I watched it and I love that. There’s also the moment at the end when they drive away and you think they’re not gonna make it because there’s loads of birds trying to get through the forcefield and bouncing off and it seems like they make it out but my brain goes to: OR IS IT?! My brain has been saying WHAT IF since I watched this film. I mean, it must be called The Endless for a reason. Maybe it really is Endless.

I have a lot of questions in my mind about when this all began. Who was the first person to get stuck? The tapes behind the locked spooky door suggest this goes deeper than the handful of characters we see. And I also wonder what the entity gets out of this. Where does it come from? How long has it existed? What does it really look like? What is the purpose of all of these different time loops? Does it feed off of them somehow? Or is it just for its own entertainment? Is it like a weird, adult version of Monsters Inc where this entity scares these people to death over and over in their little time pods, and that generates enough energy for this alien’s home world? Maybe Aaron and Justin ARE on its homeworld, trapped. Or maybe they’re actually in limbo. One theory that crossed my mind was that they actually had something to do with their mother’s death… that they inadvertantly caused her to crash with their bickering when they were kids and while she went to heaven, they went to this hell dimension where they were forced to live out their own personal sense of hell until they could come to terms with something they had to learn… which might work because the cult, and the weird angry dude may have killed themselves… And there’s a couple moments when Hal is trying to work out some answer. One way is through an equation (which supposedly is about light?? I don’t really know) and another is in a moment where he says something like ‘maybe the lesson here is forgiveness’ about Justin, after which he immediately acts in ways that are very unfogiving. Maybe they’re all stuck in hell too with something to learn before they can ‘ascend’ to heaven, and the entity is actually a monstrous Lucifer. And I’ve also seen some theories that this is all a machination of the character Mike, that he is just insane and this is all in his mind (but that would be WAY too easy).

There’s a potential further theory tied into the idea of the land being Arcadia, which is a Greek mythological bountiful, utopic garden, inhabited by shepherds and unspoiled by savagery (said savagery possibly depicted by Aaron and Justin), but I haven’t explored that concept enough to have an opinion on this. I will consider this some more!


I also enjoyed the grainy nature of the film. I don’t remember what it was like right at the beginning when they were in ‘real life’, if it was particularly colourful but the sepia type change was so subtle that it took me a long time to realise anything had changed. And at first I just thought wow dusty terrain. And then I realised that was an intentional choice to make the camp and everything stuck in these loops look like something of the past. Like an old photo. There’s even a moment where we see a man in a tent who is re-spawning over and over again and he warns Aaron(?) to get away as far as he can, and it seems like the graphics inside the tent look black and white almost which seems to depict the man’s comparative age, as in he’s been there a longggggg long time. Supposedly, he’s credited as something like 1900s man, so that makes a lot of sense. It really reminded me of BioShock Infinite actually… there are these moments in that game when you can see supplied in other dimensions as black and white blobs and the tent inside has the same sort of vibe to it. Perhaps the look of the film could have been more polished, but the film didn’t have a very big budget and I think what they managed to achieve with the budget they had is WAYYYYYY BETTTERRRR than a lot of big hollywood films.

So all in all, really enjoyable film, great idea. Love that they tied it to their previous film. It makes the world feel large and full of a lot of possibility for sequels that left me wanting to understand more. I have so many questions but I think that’s what makes this film so compelling. A+ would watch again.

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12 months of Kai [2021] [sci-fi-london.com]

“Begin setup…”


Sci Fi London 2021 is over! Just catching up now on posting about the last two feature films I saw. I had such a great time and I thank all of the writers, directors, actors, as well as Louis, Marta and the Sci Fi London crew for putting on such a great festival. The standard of films was so great and it was lovely to be able to see everyone in person.

Sci Fi London will return next year to its usual time of year (late spring/early summer). Look out there for more.

Directed by Matsumi Kameyama, 12 months of Kai is the story of the relationship between a human and an android. Kyoka, played by Ayaka Kawaguchi, lives in Tokyo and meets with her friends for coffee. It’s clear from the start that there is pressure on them all to be with someone, as they talk about potential boyfriends and husbands, even stopping to make eyes at the coffee shop dude which was a pretty humorous moment. Kyoka lives alone and it seems like her work is pretty much her life, so it’s not all that surprising when she decides to purchase/rent a ‘Personal Care Humanoid’ to take care of her needs. The humanoid, played by Kosei Kudo, arrives and is every bit as flawless and gorgeous as you can imagine. Kyoka begins setup and names the humanoid Kai. Meanwhile, she continues to date and her owning a PCH is met with horror from both her prospective partners and her friends who think Kyoka is wasting her time being with someone who cannot father her a child. Kyoka seems to genuinely care for Kai and Kai struggles with concepts of the future but otherwise seems pretty content. There are some uncomfortable moments when Kyoka’s mother comes to see her and later tells her she has cancer – which we find out later is a lie. Soon, we discover that Kai is pregnant …DUN DUN DUHHHHHHH and she informs her friends and family who are shocked and dismayed and encourage her to have an abortion. She decides to keep the baby and informs the corporation who created Kai which reveals to us that this has all been an experimental plot and that Kai is working exactly the way he was programmed to behave. Kyoka has the baby, which ends up looking Borg-esque. Kyoka is obviously super depressed and disgusted by herself and this baby, and tries to destroy it but is stopped by Kai. The corporation then moves in and drugs her and takes the baby from her. She awakes in this moodily lit room watched by a humanoid who asks her to set it up, to which she says “Begin setup” and the whole process starts all over again.

Oooooh, thinking about that ending gives me chills.

Enjoyed this one. Despite the low budget, the lighting in some scenes made the film glorious.

I could really feel the pressures on Kai in this one. It was like everyone from all angles was up in her bizness, telling her to find a REAL MAN but Kyoka seemed quite content with Kai. Her needs were pretty basic. She wasn’t looking for a kid. She was pretty content talking to Kai and could dismiss questions she didn’t want to talk about… which is pretty easy living if you think about it. How many relationships have you been in where there was something you didn’t want to talk about for whatever reason and your partner just let it go? It doesn’t really happen, at least not in my experience so I guess that’s why the relationship seemed so peaceful… haha.. but obviously nothing lasts forever. Kyoka found herself in unchartered territories where she didn’t know what to do. Her friends were split between being astonished and telling her to get rid of this baby. Her mother was complete trash. She lied about having cancer, or at least Kai said that she had. You could potentially read into that and suspect Kai is trying to pull Kyoka away from her support mechanisms and the loves in her life as it is Kai who tells her that her mother lied to her, but I couldn’t be sure. Whatever Kai’s intention, he lets it go and you never hear about it again. It probably contributes to Kyoka feeling like she really had no one to turn to by the end of the film, which contributes to her resigning herself to starting the whole process again. It really had me asking WHAT IS GOING THROUGH YOUR MIND KYOKA?! WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT TO YOURSELF AGAINNNNN?!?!?!

One cool thing I noticed about the film, was that Kai’s scenes were filmed with the actor keeping his eyelids open the whole time… which I would not have even clocked had I not heard this cool factoid about the film ‘Scott Pilgrim v the world’ the same weekend, in that the actors in their scenes were instructed to not blink while on camera, and that was to mirror the comic in which obviously none of the characters blink on the panels. The effect that had on the Scott Pilgrim film, and on this particular film is that there is a strange intensity about the character. It’s almost like that sensation the ‘uncanny valley’ where you see a human-like animation and it’s so close to real life but your brain is looking at the resemblance and trying to tear it apart.

Anyway, there’s not really much to say about this film so I’ll leave it there, but it was a strange but enjoyable concept. Well acted. The baby was particularly gruesome which shocked a lot of the people watching including myself, which I enjoyed! Really appreciate that the director came all the way from Japan to talk about the film as well and answer my question about the blinking(!) and it seemed like the writing of the concept was a very collaborative process which I love to hear.

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Glasshouse [2021] [sci-fi-london.com]

“Once upon a time, there was a girl. She came upon an enchanted castle made of glass. Only people who remembered their names could enter there.”


Directed by Kelsey Egan, this South African film is set in a dystopian future where something called ‘The Shred’ has ravaged the world. It’s an airborne virus which literally shreds the memories and brain functions of people. One family seem to have thought of everything and live in a glass house surrounded by plant life. From the onset of the film, we learn that trespassers are shot on sight and used for fertiliser for their plants. As barbaric as that may seem, this family have very quaint, respectful traditions that surround these tributes whereby they recognise the life of these people before they become food for their tomatoes… In fact, their whole schtick is very ‘Little House on the prairie’ complete with oxygen mask bonnets. They live very simple lives led by the matriarch of the group where everyone plays an integral part to the upkeep of the house, taking turns to clean, plant and do ‘century duty’ which involves protecting the perimeter and Evie collects items which she hides to help preserve the memories of the past. One day, an attractive male stranger joins the group and the eldest daughter, ‘Bee’ takes him in – which is totally against the rules. This stranger is injured so they sew him up and when he wakes in chains, they explain that he will need to earn his keep. His inclusion into the family starts to dramatically mess with the normal flow of things in the house. Gabe, a teenage boy in the fam, whose mind has been affected by ‘The Shred’ obviously distrusts the stranger. Bee is very taken by him and makes excuses to be around him. Evie does not trust him but there is an obvious chemistry between the two of them. The stranger falsely claims to be the family’s long lost elder brother/son Luka (who apparently had an incestuous relationship with Bee in the past and who they believe will return). Bee believes this immediately but the others are not so sure. The matriarch agrees that he can stay for as long as it takes to provide Bee with a child but that he must leave after that. Learning about this, the stranger murders the mother and points the finger at Gabe (exposing him to further effects of The Shred, which renders him completely comatose and unable to defend himself against the accusations). We learn that the stranger is not affected by the virus. Evie blames herself, that it was her fault in the first place as Gabe went outside as a child when she should have been watching him. They agree to changing the way they do things and the last scenes show them accepting their new path as a group. In the last scene we see Gabe come across proof that none of the family are the original family members, that no one is who they believe themselves to be, before he is shot by the stranger.

It’s really hard to sum up this film well, because there’s a lot going on. First off, I loved this film so much. It was utterly beautiful.

Musically, they stripped down the film to its bare bones which was excellent and I’ll explain why. They included some sounds to create tension but most of the noticeable ‘music’ in the film was from the actors themselves through these folk songs about their history. They had them singing beautiful acapella folk songs with lyrics such as “Hold your breath, the shred hollows all. Minds erode like rust.” Folk songs historically are devices used to pass down stories of strife through generations so this stylistic choice inclusion was really smart and a concise way of quickly explaining to the viewer what happened without having to be like “and then so and so happened and we did so and so”. Having read a couple negative reviews, it looks like this film was criticised for not explaining more about the world outside of the house, which I would disagree in light of the folk stories and songs. The stories of the past are there if you just listen, but obviously they’re all from the family’s insular perspective. They don’t really know what happened outside of the Glasshouse. Using these folk songs also makes the landscape very quiet, which in itself is tense, and it made me feel like I was there. Similar effect to the ‘A Quiet Place’ film… it feels very sinister and uncomfortable to not have your ears barraged by constant soundtrack and that pulls you right in, making any sound you do hear more poignant.

This is funny to say but I enjoyed even the name of the virus. Like imagine if there was an airborne virus with the potential to take out even the most intelligent scientists on the planet who might typically give it a convoluted, medical name like ABC298309, and all is left is this literal name. It shreds your memories so this family call it The Shred… it was a cute touch.

Obviously the concept is not unique.. pandemic and family trying to make it work.. stranger intrusion etc etc. What’s interesting about this particular take is that the longer you watch this, as their stories unfold, you realise how little you know the characters. Usually the longer you watch a film, the more you understand right? However, in Glasshouse, the more you watch the more you realise these people are actually complete strangers to you. Not only that but they don’t even know that they are not who they say they are. They’ve been told a line through these folk songs and the stories that this mother figure has told them and the stories they etched on their window (like caveman paintings on the inside of a cave) and in a world of uncertainty, they take all of that as complete truth… which we later discover is not the case. Why would they ever question it, you might ask? I mean, in light of the actual truth, even if they had been told they probably wouldn’t remember… This makes this story and its truth kind of timeless because you learn the truth and you’re like ‘wait a minute… wait a goddamn minute… how long has this been going on?’ There’s no way for you to say exactly. It has the potential to be timeless, or in the very least it means the pandemic may have happened centuries and centuries ago. *POW* Mind blown…

One cool and annoying thing is that these characters, through their mottos and mantras tell you the reveal throughout the film, but you don’t see it until the end, for example “everyone has their place”… or “in a world of madness, we have found order”. It’s that choice of words which doesn’t seem important until you get to the end, and you realise that these choices of words are vital. ‘Found’? Not created order, but found…

And the last thing is that with the exception of the matriarch and Evie, it seems – and again you don’t discover this until the end – that everyone has actually succumbed to ‘The Shred’. The fact that these stories are able to be rewritten so many times by this ‘family’ kind of proves that. It also broadens the meaning of ‘brother’ and ‘sister’ you initially come to understand and definitely makes it a hell of a lot less creepy.. and it also explains why there is never a patriarch mentioned. Because we are told they are a family I wondered about this, but it turns out there IS no patriarch because they’re not actually family(!) At least, that’s my theory.

I could honestly think about this film for days so I will just leave it there and close off by saying that this film is incredible. Beautifully shot. Really well acted. Creepy and twisted in many ways. Concept and the script are excellent. I’m gonna be thinking about this film for some time. A+, would watch again.

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Scent of a Forest [2021] [sci-fi-london.com]

**smells orb**


No quote this time so you’ll have to make do with a descriptive intro haha

Voted this year’s sci-fi-london.com film festival ‘short film’ favourite, I was really stoked that the fest decided to pair this film on Saturday evening alongside their final feature of the day (I’ll put my review up for the feature separately). I’ve not had a chance to see any of the shorts in person due to my work schedule this year. Thankfully, through the power of technology, Sci Fi London will be sharing their 2021 short film selection online from 27th October until 31st. You can get a pass here for only £12. I’m gonna be doing the same and will share some short reviews on this site for those films.

Okay, back to Scent of a Forest!

This film was directed by Servaes Dewispelaere and was his BA degree project, which is really impressive and I’m looking forward to seeing what he makes in future. It centres on a young woman called Ana, played by Eliza Stuyck, who works in a scent shop. It’s clear that in this dystopian world, the natural worldly things that we take for granted like trees, forests, beaches and so on are all gone. It’s never explained what has happened and the director didn’t explain their interpretation about this in the Q&A either, but it could be some sort of ecological disaster or perhaps nuclear fallout. Regardless, people appear to be dosing themselves with a golden orb drug which when broken, emits a scent of various things which no longer exist in this time. The only catch is that to buy this little orb, you need to sell your soul.

Ana and her boyfriend Peter, played by Luca Persan, talk about the drug. Peter brings Ana to his mother to show him the effects of the drug. Peter’s mother is almost comatose and is seen spooning water into her mouth like it is soup, but comes alive with dance when she inhales the drug in front of them. Peter and Ana are seen staring at the ensuing dance in a series of artistic shots. I particularly liked the shot of Peter seen watching his mother through a mirror reflection. Ana then admits to Peter that she sold her soul months back in order to have the drug. The final scene shows Peter buying the drug, sold to him by Ana who responds to him coldly, and it cuts to birdsong for the credits.

This is a really beautifully done short. It’s pretty unusual for me to get caught up in shorts, typically, but this one really pulled me in. It’s a great concept and not one many directors tend to tackle because obviously conveying scent in film is hard. What I liked about the way this director did it is that the prolonged effects of using this drug totally ravaged the body, so the stark difference between pre-smell to post-smell was visually obvious in that these people went from being non-respondent to dancing rhythmically, and the dances were as unique as we all are. For instance when Peter’s mum dances, it’s quite a manic style I guess, whereas Ana’s dance is more graceful. Obviously this drug, whatever it is, helps these people get through the days so they don’t really care that they sold their souls to get it. It seems that reality is an ugly place it exist in, in this dystopia.

The living quarters of Peter’s mum, which seemed to be an underground bunker and the dark/underground vibe that the film gave off implied, at least to me, that there had been nuclear fallout. Maybe all the forests burned down. I don’t remember there being any sunlight but maybe that’s just the impression I got; but definitely most of the filming if not all was either inside or in darkness. And with the end credits rolling the way they did with the birdsong, it had a strange effect on me as the viewer in that I could almost smell the forest as I expect Peter did. There’s something about certain cues as far as sounds go that can transport you to certain smells and visa versa, so this was a really cool device.

So all in all, excellent short. Not surprised it was voted the best short of the fest. Really looking forward to seeing more from Dewispelaere.

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Repeat [2021] [sci-fi-london.com]

“Where do we go when we die”


Directed by Grant Archer and Richard Miller, this film ponders the almighty question; What happens after we die?

I wasn’t originally planning on seeing this film but I was unfortunately ill and couldn’t see Exposure36 so I decided to come out to this one to get my sciencey fill!

So… Repeat!! In this film, scientist Ryan Moore played by Tom England, works for the research department at a university. While attempting to create tech that can interpret thoughts he stumbles across an altogether different invention which he believes allows him to reach people BEYOND THE VEILLLLL. We see him testing this tech on various people who had recently lost their loved ones. The tech itself looks like a selfie light wrapped in copper wire, connected to an old computer with the DNA slot looking like a CD drive, which I really love by the way. It’s pretty well known by pals that I happen to really enjoy sci-fi where the Tech looks like it is made out of vacuum parts so I enjoy tech that looks very DIY. Anyways. I digress. We soon learn that Ryan and his wife Emily, played by Charlotte Ritchie, have also lost someone dear to them, their young daughter Sam. It’s unclear what happened and the story leads us to believe that she was abducted by a hooded man after school. The loss has clearly put a massive strain on the relationship, and various attempts to tackle their problems head on are pushed under the mat.

Ryan becomes increasingly more intense and obsessed as the police investigation runs dry. With no leads, he takes it upon himself to investigate teachers and friends and ends up alienating them all forcing him into an even bigger introspective spiral. He hopes to make contact with Rebecca but each attempt fails. One day he finds that Emily has swabbed her DNA with the intent to use the machine to try to make contact (she stops short of actually doing so). Ryan continues and manages to make contact discovering that his child is indeed dead. Troubled by this discovery and after he temporarily manages to manifest her using the machine, he boosts the machine and finds himself transported to the day Sam disappeared. He tries to prevent her from being taken when she suddenly disappears and we learn **MASSIVE SPOILER** that the machine does not talk to the dead but to people sleeping and inadvertently kills those it makes contact with. The weight of this discovery is palpable. Ryan attempts to send a message to his computer in the past only for that message to start the loop all over again!

I enjoyed this one. The film had plenty red herrings baked into the story that made you think you were being taken in various directions only to end up somewhere completely different. It was really interesting being able to attend the Q&A because the director/writer spoke of just that in the writing process; that he had intended for the film to be a lighthearted ghostbusters-esque jaunt, but creativity had a different path in mind for him. Anyways, it would have been all too easy for the cause of Sam’s disappearance to have been the ominous hooded figure. Also, I really enjoyed the fact that we all thought we were watching a film about life after death and instead we were slapped in the face with IT WAS A TIME TRAVEL FILM ALL ALONGGGGGGG **SLAP SLAP SLAP**

The science/tech side of things felt like the right tone. You know, how scientists create new inventions in their basements… It’s murky and thrown together and a complete mess, all the while the scientist is telling you “IT’S COMPLETELY SAFE” when you know they have no idea what they’re doing. There were some laughable moments like that in this film where Ryan is asking these people, and by extension those of us watching the film, to trust him and for the most part we do. And then we learn that we really shouldn’t trust him. That he is stabbing in the dark, that this invention of his is actually killing him.. that his morality is totally called into question and fails, that he is stealing an unknown, radioactive chemical from the same university who are funding and trusting him in order to power this invention of his… and then there’s the moment where he intensely interrogates a teenage girl – the friend of his daughter – and when she doesn’t tell him what he wants to hear he starts to manhandle her and shouts at her I KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE. I had to laugh at that point. Like no wonder she’s running from you, dude. Take it down a fricking notch! At no point does he recognise just how lost he is and that his attitude and this invention of his is hurting people. Even at the very end, his instinct is to use the machine to better this situation he has found himself in, the irony being that if he had taken a moment to really criticise himself, he would have realised that he is the cause of all his and his family’s pain. I was really hoping that Ryan would try to make contact with his past self and in doing so, would kill himself and save his and so many other’s lives, or to destroy the machine thus doing the same, but then it would not have looped so cleverly. So I’m willing to accept the discomfort and annoyance I feel towards the choices Ryan has ultimately made for a cool ending. Ryan really, truly believes that his invention could be used for good and can’t help himself; that was his undoing ultimately because it totally screwed him. I guess in hindsight, he never could help himself, and never will!

There’s a sub-storyline in there about who the real father of Sam is, but even though it’s this shocking elephant in the room that is hinted when Emily uses the DNA swab and then doesn’t get mentioned until much later, it’s not really important to the plot. To him, Ryan is Sam’s father and nothing will change that (which I think is really sweet). And again, it’s just a red herring to confuse the viewer anyways.

So all in all, liked the plot and the twisty turns. Interesting mish-mash of sci fi films (mixing life after death with time travel) and I think the causality was smartly done. Found it hard to suspend my disbelief looking at the invention, but I kinda loved that I knew what the component parts were. Enjoyable performances and some familiar faces. Enjoyed watching this one.

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Warning [2021] [opening night @ sci-fi-london.com]

“Can you really put a value on human life?”


Hurray Sci Fi London 2021 is here! A week long of curated short and feature length films, hosted by Sci-Fi-London.com at Stratford Picturehouse in London! I was honoured to have been invited by Louis, Marta and the team to opening night and I’m looking forward to checking out what else the week unfolds! Come watchalong with me. I’ll be seeing the following so come say hi:

Really wish I could see more but unfortunately I can’t this time. I’m gonna try and catch some of the shorts. Louis – the founder of the festival – recommended ‘The Scent of a Forest’ (directed by Servaes Dewispelaere) which the team voted as their fave short of this year’s lot so if nothing else, be sure to check that out and let me know what you think!

So, back to WARNING!

Warning, directed by Agata Alexander, starts out from the onset with a mechanic astronaut who is set on a personal path of disaster when the tech he has been sent to fix explodes, hurtling him into nothingness. He is given days to live.

Meanwhile on earth we touch on the stories, humanity and inhumanity of current life on earth. We see a woman who is released from the routine of her Alexa-esque connection to God 2.0 when one day it malfunctions and she is forced to continue her spiritual journey alone. There’s a teenage girl who hopes to make a bunch of money for a better life by allowing a random stranger to invade her consciousness for just a weekend which ends up taking a very dark turn. There’s a seemingly young couple meeting the fam for the first time, and we soon discover that the man in the couple is immortal while she is not. The mother does not approve. There’s the story of an elderly robot who cannot be sold, and we see a sliver of humanity in it as it dances with another robot/android, shrouded behind a curtain. There’s the guy who just can’t let the past stay in the past, much to the horror of his ex girlfriend. And a small child, looking to the sky, wishing her father home.

I thought it was a wonderful start to the festival. I wondered about the title of the film.. warning. Could the astronaut have warned people of what was to come? It felt like he could not have, which makes it all the more tragic. That he had to sit and watch it unfold. I imagined his death as he ran out of oxygen all alone in the vastness of space wondering if he could have done something. Was it our choices that should have served as a warning? That we were on a path of destruction? No. It appeared inevitable. That regardless of the choices the characters would have made, they were bound by the exact same fate. It amused me at least that the immortal elite were seemingly also bound by this and I thought to myself, they cannot buy themselves out of this quandary.

I noticed these images throughout of this sort of sterile, sanctioned life… Beautiful flowers covered with bugs living in little sealed greenhouses or cages in peoples home, almost like little reminders of life among perfect homes with perfect wallpaper of plants.

Each mini story could honestly have been a movie in itself and I think it was in the section on mortality where something was said that resonated for me in this film. That immortality makes life less precious and I think in some way that is true of this film. Sure. Each section could have been entire films, but it was the miniature nature of these different stories that ended up making this film so precious. All these small hints of life woven into an untidy, tragic story about the end of days. Of love and loss. Of a desire to connect in a modern time.

I think the main takeaway I had and perhaps this was the purpose of the film, is that it is itself a warning. How would you act? How would you wish to spend your last days on earth if you had a warning? With greed? Living in the past? With hope? With a loved one? Alone? Helpless? Would you have made different choices? What would make your life more meaningful?

So all in all, I thought this film was poetic. It managed to somehow pull off chaotic and tidy all at once. There were some pretty famous actors in the mix which was quite surprising to see. Overall enjoyed it and loved that the concept had me thinking for hours after I left the cinema. Would recommend checking it out!

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Wargames [1983]

“Is this real or is it a game?”


WarGames is a 1983 film, written by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes and directed by John Badham. It follows the protagonist David, played by a very young Matthew Broderick (pre-Ferris Bueller). David is intelligent but rebellious and has very little interest in school. He ends up hacking a game system with his phone which sets off a chain of events with a super computer that appears to be starting geothermonuclear war. Believing him to be a soviet spy (classic American hijinks), the feds look him up but he manages to get away and reaches the original creator of the super computer to try to have him convince the powers that be that it is all just a game and that they shouldn’t retaliate…

So, I have seen this before when I was a young kid who didn’t quite understand what the film was about, but I remember feeling really in awe of David because he had all the markers of someone who was really cool. And I guess when you’re a kid you feel pretty darn uncool 100% of the time so any mention of cool will turn your head. In the context of this film, cool looks like an early to mid teen, academic underachiever but actually really bright dude who sneaks into tech he shouldn’t do so he can play games. Which in hindsight, is exactly who I became after I saw this film. I don’t know if I was influenced by the film but looking back I must have been. I mean, not insomuch as intentionally underachieving in school… I attribute that to undiagnosed ADHD, but more the sneaky, sneaky computer behaviour. When I was a kid, my dad – an IT teacher – forbid computer games in the house. He thought they were a waste of time. So I would sneak and install games on his computer, play them for a while and then uninstall and wipe all traces of the game from existence. Which was all fine, until one day it corrupted the hard disk and my plan was discovered…

Anyways, I digress… There was something about David’s character in this film that was effortlessly cool and it’s all down to the actor, right? Because he had that same glib and charm when he did the film Ferris Bueller. You were rooting for him to get away with it, with that darned smile, and those sparkling eyes and his boyish butter-wouldn’t-melt. It feels a bit like WarGames was the prequel to Ferris Bueller. I like to think that, anyways. That he’s still out there, messing shit up and not learning his lesson.

I have to say though, watching it with older eyes this time round, it was pretty hard to suspend my disbelief. I remember saying out loud when they guessed the scientist’s password “well that’s a really shit password, of course they cracked it”. And when David managed to get away from the feds so easily I was like “is that honestly the first person they ever arrested or something?” The incompetence! Also the romantic element was a bit redundant but that’s old films for you.

There were a lot of moments like that but none of that takes away from the joy and exhilaration watching this, of the anticipation for David to convince the adults. And I guess in a way when I was a kid, I left the film feeling like – as a kid – I could do anything. If you could convince an an adult fed or scientist/engineer that what you had to say had merit, even if you needed to get help from someone to vouch for you, then maybe you could do just about anything. If only the adults would listen.

Anyways, overall very fun film. Obviously a cult classic. Loved the ye olde 80s bit computer graphics, particularly when the super computer was flashing map after map. That’s total edge-of-your-seat watching right there. Love that the computer in the end is really poetic. Would watch again (probably many times over).

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Real Genius [1985]

“Well, gentlemen, now what? Things are going okay so far, aren’t they?”


This is another one of those films that I watched MONTHS ago and didn’t have the capacity to blog about at the time, so here goes NOTHINK!

This sci-fi comedy film, directed by Martha Coolidge, stars Val Kilmer and Gabriel Jarret. It’s about a bunch of nerd-bros at a science and engineering university. Kilmer’s character Chris Knight is working on a science project for his degree which involves LASERSSSSSS but little does he know that his professor has been covertly working with the CIA to develop that project into a weapon. Not only that but one which would allow them to do nefarious things FROM SPACE!!! Chris is roomed with a bright, young high school student called Mitch who he shows the ropes to, which seems to involve bullying him (I guess it was a different time eh…?), a lot of partays and foam and drinking and getting up to no good. And then there’s a mysterious character who keeps disappearing into their wardrobe which makes it like some weird version of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Basically it all comes down to this final project which goes through twists and turns involving sabotage by a fellow student interspersed with some 80s tunes and montages. Eventually Chris nails the design which pleases his professor who then steals the laser. Chris learns about the true nature of the task too late and realises the laser is gone! There’s a weird, goofy bit where they put a radio transmitter into the mouth of their fellow student to learn more about this plot to get the location of an air force base. They reprogram the machine so the laser points to a prism which ends up exploding a bunch of popcorn in the professors home. SUCCESS! **jumps mid-air with a fist punched to the air so you know it’s a REAL success, one fit for a REAL genius! HUZZAH! ETC!**

So… what an odd film. I don’t have too much to say about it; it’s not a complex film, and I don’t have complex feelings about it.

I watched this with my Plex Film Club buddies. I’ve probably mentioned them before. HEY BUDS!

This is exactly the kind of film you need to watch with friends because it is so so so goofy that if you watch it alone, you won’t make it to the end.

It’s typical of a lot of the more corny 80s science fiction in that it follows the same sort of formula. There’s a humorous, ‘dashing’ lead who outsmarts them all with just a few montages set to a synthy soundtrack. Somewhere in the mix is a foe, a bunch of loyal friends, one girl or woman to act as the romantic storyline and in the end the lead + pals always win, and the foe is ridiculed. HOW THEY LAUGH HO HO HO. I think if I hadn’t seen so many films that follow this same formula, I would be more enthusiastic about it, but I think it was missing something for me. I guess I am comparing it to other similar sciencey protagonist storyline films of its time like WarGames which ended up way more entertaining and which I hold in higher regard. Also I would say I’ve seen Val Kilmer – in my eyes – at his best later on in his career through Willow and even Batman, so for lots of reasons this film feels pretty juvenile. But I guess what can you expect from a film labelling itself REAL GENIUS. Say the title as if you are Trevor Noah mimicking Donald Trump. I dare you. That pretty much sums up how I feel about the film.

Overall, it was enjoyable and one to watch with the lads. Fun, 80s white Americana nostalgia if you like that sorta thing, but nothing really to write home about and it hasn’t stood the test of time for me. Soz.

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Sorry to bother you [2018]

“I just really need a job”


Wow it has been a really long time since I’ve been on my science fiction shit, watching and posting to my site. I’ve been recuperating from surgery but I’m much better now so let’s get back to it, eh!?

I watched this film months ago some time in my recovery so my memory is sketchy, but loosely, the film (directed by Boots RIley) follows Cassius Green (played by Lakeith Stanfield) and there are some other big names in the film as well like Danny Glover, Patton Oswalt, David Cross and more. From the offset, Cassius is struggling. He lives in his Uncle’s garage with his girlfriend. He gets a job as a telemarketer for a large corporation called RegalView – largely it seems to impress his girlfriend –  which progressively presents itself to be quite a morally corrupt company. The aim of the job is to call random people and sell shit and Cassius finds that he is not successful until he puts on his “white” voice at which point he starts to excel in the company. Meanwhile, his colleagues form a union to strike unfair working conditions at the company but Cassius sells out to get a higher paid position in the “elite” team. While working there he discovers that the company are selling military arms through cheap labour, that employees sign up for lifetime contracts and are living in conditions that could be likened to prison. Then, after being invited to the CEO’s house party, he makes an even more sordid discovery that he finds hard to ignore…

Didn’t want to give too much away, but I really enjoyed this film. 

On the face of it, it was a dark comedy but the deeper I went into the film, the more fantastical it became weaving themes around inequality throughout. From the start with Cassius’s living conditions which are ridiculous but totally normalised, to the working conditions that RegalView put their staff through, the clear tiered hierarchy between normal people and the “elite”… And there’s this moment at the house party where Cassius, who is a Black man, is made to rap to his fellow colleagues and on being asked to do that, he imploringly looks to the other Person Of Colour in the room, as if to say ‘is this for real’ who gives this blank look in response… it’s so sinister and illustrates this obvious hierarchy of power between white people and POC even among the “elite” tier in the company. It’s also a pretty typical racist microaggression in real life… Instead of getting to know Cassius, they’ve made assumptions about him based on his colour as if he belongs to a monoculture… It would be like approaching an Asian person and asking them to do some karate moves or to make sushi for you… 

I would be curious to know if someone who was racially all white (not mixed like myself or not a POC) picked up on the same tensions that I felt throughout; it felt like it was building for a long time to the point that the ending was a bit like a kick in the stomach. But then it also felt like despite hearing throughout the film through snippets of news and so on that something strange was happening at the company, the inequalities seemed so much like normal life that the ending really came out of leftfield. Damn I really wish I had written this post as soon as I had seen the film because my memory is a little hazy right now. I’ve read some other reviews of the film where people thought it was messy. If I was to be super critical I would say I didn’t really rate the girlfriend sub-plot in the film. Her character felt like just a device to illustrate how down-on-his-luck Cassius was and a yard stick to show us how morally deficient Cassius had become, but that was also pretty clear through the way he treated the union so I’m not sure that her plot really added anything. Though I love Tessa Thompson. She’s a total babe and an excellent actress. Let me know what you thought about it yourself in the comments. Would love to hear what people thought!

CN: sexual assault

One thing to note was that I found out afterwards that the actor who played the CEO, Armie Hammer, had allegedly sexually assaulted a number of women IRL which I of course believe. In retrospect, his inclusion in the film soured it for me (and has soured a number of other films Armie has been in which I loved like the beautiful ‘call me by your name’) but it’s not often you have films with such diversity, with such an unusual story. I’m just glad the film seems to have had a great critical response despite that. 

So, all in all, original story. Surprising, yet so familiar it could be set in the near future. Loved Lakeith’s performance as well as the performances of the peripheral characters. Really enjoyed it. Check it out on Netflix. 

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Devs [TV] [2020]

“The box contains us. The box contains everything. And inside the box, is another box.”


Oh man. I usually write these little posts straight after I finish a film or TV show but life has been a little strange of late so I hadn’t had the chance. Therefore my memory of the comings and going of this show are a little hazy but here goes…

This show centres around a high tech department (DEVs) of a company called Amaya, run by Nick Offerman’s character named Forest. Forest has various ‘disciples’ who, it would appear, would do almost anything to protect Forest and the company, and you quickly learn that Amaya seems to operate ‘above the law’ helped by a close relationship with the government. Though he won’t admit it, much of the impetus behind Forest’s vision for Amaya is to turn back time and absolve himself of a terrible tragedy which took the lives of his wife and child.

There are going to be big SPOILERS from now on so look awayyyy.

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Okay, so with that in mind, the story begins with a character called Sergei who is a bright coder with great potential. He is dating a woman called Lily who is a fellow engineer at the same company. Sergei is invited to progress to the DEVs department but on his first day attempts to steal information, which triggers a MASSIVE chain of events starting with his death and affecting a great many people. Lily attempts to uncover the truth with the help, weirdly, of her jilted ex-partner, all while being pursued by Kenton – Forest’s very own version of Odd Job – trained in cleaning up aka murdering problematic people.

There’s also a sub-plot in there involving Russian spies, a very cute worker-friendship between Stewart and Langdon, a tense romantic energy between Forest and Katie (his chief engineer) and as the story goes we uncover more and more about what this extraordinary machine in their department can do… which as it turns out is a mix between televising (to an nth degree of certainty) the past or potentially representing a multi-verse of potential outcomes… it’s not entirely clear, but it is clear that it is extraordinary!

I was also super excited to see a character I perceived as trans or potentially non binary in the show through character Langdon, only to find out that this was not the intention. In addition, the actor was in fact a cis women so was a little confusing about this choice but apparently Garland just wanted to cast a cis gendered woman in that role and it’s as simple as that. Very happy to see Janet Mock playing the senator in this show though <3

What’s so intriguing to me about this show is how it is largely about death. There’s something hopeful about the way that the Amaya engineers are looking to this machine and it’s possibilities but the series starts with death and ends with death, and death is peppered throughout. It’s in both super violent, brutal and dark ways, in schrodinger’s cat take-a-chance sort of ways and then also more matter-of-factly (like here is a dead mouse… it is dead…) scientific representation of death. But even though it is dark, I never came away from watching it feeling put off by the amount of death there was. And I think that is a testiment to how exciting and novel the show turned out to be. Also, having recently read the book ‘The Space Between Worlds’ by Micaiah Johnson which also explores multiverses and the infinitesimal choices in our lives that make massive impacts on the people we turn out to be, it was super interesting to see an alternative viewpoint on this theme so soon after. It’s kind of mindblowing when you think how your life could have changed if you took a different bus one day, or if your parents had not met or things like that. I have been thinking about this quite a lot lately since reading Kindred by Octavia E Butler as well, in light of my own families struggle for survival on both the maternal and paternal side. What if my maternal ancestors had been slaughtered by the Ottoman Empire and not made it to safety on my mum’s side? What if my Chinese grandad never made it on the boat to the Caribbean? What if my great great grandad was murdered by his enslaver or died on the boat over from Africa, or my great great grandmothers line had been wiped out when the English and French colonists murdered her tribe. It boggles my mind how precious life is, and how rare and lucky we all are to be here today and read these silly words about some TV show! haha

Anyways, enough of the deep stuff.

I know Garland has a reputation for being a bit pretentious and I can see some thinking it’s a bit too slow or a bit much or a bit flat or monochrome, but I really enjoyed this show. It was heartbreaking, captivating and at times really beautiful. Not to mention the soundtrack. I joke about the making of the soundscape on my insta/tiktok, but there is something to be said about having a film director produce a TV show, and the results are similar to that of The Mandalorian which had the same dealio, in that it creates epic, cinematic TV shows. Not saying I liked it as much as Mando tho. haha

So in all, really enjoyable show. Well done. Exciting. Very sexy lighting and look to the show. Really confused about the comments from viewers calling it an indulgent show tbh. ALL OF FILM AND TV IS INDULGENT. IT’S A CHEEKY BONUS! IT’S NOT NECESSARY FOR SURVIVAL, OF COURSE IT IS INDULGENT! IF YOU DON’T LIKE IT, NO ONE IS FORCING YOU TO CONTINUE WATCHING APART FROM YOURSELFFFFFF. Unless there is a ‘Clockwork Orange’ thing going on here… in which case I’m sorry, but there’s worse shows to be forced to watch. I can think of a few at least (**COUGH** Replicas **COUGH**) Anyways, well worth a watch.

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